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Figure 3: Changes in serum hormonal levels from the onset of radiotherapy. The serum estradiol level, which was very high before radiotherapy, rapidly decreased after the onset of radiotherapy (dashed line; pg/mL). The serum luteinizing hormone level (solid line; mIU/mL) and serum follicle stimulating hormone level (long dashed, short dashed line; mIU/mL) gradually increased after radiotherapy. These changes in hormonal levels suggested that our patient was of post-menopausal status. FSH; follicle stimulating hormone, LH; luteinizing hormone, RT; radiotherapy.

Image Text (High Precision): Hormonal beginning estradiol level levels months radiotherapy

Other Images from "Radiotherapy for inoperable and refractory endometriosis presenting with massive hemorrhage: a case report":


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Figure 3 Changes in serum hormonal levels from th...

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Abstract

IntroductionMany patients with endometriosis are treated with medication or by surgical approaches. However, a small number of patients do not respond to medication and are inoperable because of comorbidities. This case report shows the effectiveness of radiotherapy for refractory endometriosis and includes a time series of serum estradiol levels.Case presentationA 47-year-old Asian woman presented to our facility with uncontrolled endometriosis refractory to medication. Our patient was considered inoperable because of severe idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and underwent radiotherapy for massive genital bleeding requiring blood transfusions. A radiation dose of 20Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, including the bilateral ovaries, uterus, and myomas. An additional 10Gy in five fractions was delivered to the endometrium to control residual bleeding. Genital bleeding was completely inhibited on day 46 after radiotherapy. Hormonal analysis revealed that radiotherapy induced post-menopausal status. Two years after radiotherapy, atypical genital bleeding had not recurred and has been well controlled without side effects.ConclusionsDisrupted ovarian function is an adverse effect of radiotherapy. However, radiotherapy can be useful for inducing menopause. In cases of medication-refractory or inoperable endometriosis, radiotherapy would be an effective treatment option.


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