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: Fig 1 Selection of cohort and denominators for analyses in study of trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of infant mortality

Image Text (High Precision): 347 350 Hospital Infant Intrapartum Missing PJ Record Scotland age analysis antepartum between beyond birth births category cohort data death deaths deprivation excluded gestational infants linked neonatal period pregnancies singleton stillbirth stillbirths survival throughput weeks weight

Other Images from "Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in risk of sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of infant mortality, and stillbirth in Scotland: population based study":


Fig 1 Selection of cohort and denominato...

Fig 2 Rates of postneonatal infant death...

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Abstract

Objectives To compare changes in inequalities in sudden infant death syndrome with other causes of infant mortality and stillbirth in Scotland, 1985-2008.Design Retrospective cohort study.Setting Scotland 1985-2008, analysed by four epochs of six years.Participants Singleton births of infants with birth weight >500 g born at 28-43 weeks’ gestation.Main outcome measures Sudden infant death syndrome, other causes of postneonatal infant death, neonatal death, and stillbirth. Odds ratios expressed as the association across the range of seven categories of Carstairs deprivation score.Results The association between deprivation and the risk of all cause stillbirth and infant death varied between the four epochs (P=0.04). This was wholly explained by variation in the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (P<0.001 for interaction). Among women living in areas of low deprivation, there was a sharp decline in the rate of sudden infant death syndrome from 1990 to 1993. Among women living in areas of high deprivation, there was a slower decline in sudden infant death syndrome rates between 1992 and 2004. Consequently, the odds ratio for the association between socioeconomic deprivation and sudden infant death syndrome increased from 2.04 (95% confidence interval 1.53 to 2.72) in 1985-90, to 7.52 (4.62 to 12.25) in 1991-6, and 9.50 (5.46 to 16.53) in 1997-2002 but fell to 1.78 (0.87 to 3.65) in 2002-8. The interaction remained significant after adjustment for maternal characteristics.Conclusion The rate of sudden infant death syndrome declined throughout Scotland in the early 1990s. The decline had a later onset and was slower among women living in areas of high deprivation, probably because of slower uptake of recommended changes in infant sleeping position. The effect was to create a strong independent association between deprivation and sudden infant death syndrome where one did not exist before.


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