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Fig. 2 Prevalence and cumulative incidence of d...

Figure 2 Maximal acute reactions observed. Gradin...

Figure 2 Late Effects Normal Tissues (LENT) – Sub...

Figure 1 Improved RTOG grades for oral mucositis ...

Figure 2 Photograph showing a representative pati...

Figure 1 Acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG).

Figure 2 Acute genitourinary toxicity (RTOG).

Figure 3 Acute skin toxicity (RTOG).

Figure 1 Actuarial RTOG grade 2-3 late gastrointe...

Figure 2 Actuarial RTOG grade 2-3 late genitourin...

Figure 2: Proportion of patients reporting grade 2 or worse LENT SOMA subjective xerostomia and RTOG salivary gland side-effectsp values quoted compare proportions with grade 2 or worse side-effects in each group with a χ2 test. Error bars represent 95% CIs. IMRT=intensity-modulated radiotherapy. LENT SOMA=Late Effects of Normal Tissues Subjective-Objective Management Analytic. RTOG=Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.

Image Text (High Precision): completion conventional effects months number radiotherapy salivary subjective xerostomia

Other Images from "Parotid-sparing intensity modulated versus conventional radiotherapy in head and neck cancer (PARSPORT): a phase 3 multicentre randomised controlled trial":


Figure 1 Study profileIMRT=intensity-modulated ra...

Figure 2 Proportion of patients reporting grade 2...

Figure 3 Mean EORTC HN35 dry mouth subscale score...

Figure 4 Kaplan-Meier plot of locoregional progre...

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Abstract

SummaryBackgroundXerostomia is the most common late side-effect of radiotherapy to the head and neck. Compared with conventional radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce irradiation of the parotid glands. We assessed the hypothesis that parotid-sparing IMRT reduces the incidence of severe xerostomia.MethodsWe undertook a randomised controlled trial between Jan 21, 2003, and Dec 7, 2007, that compared conventional radiotherapy (control) with parotid-sparing IMRT. We randomly assigned patients with histologically confirmed pharyngeal squamous-cell carcinoma (T1–4, N0–3, M0) at six UK radiotherapy centres between the two radiotherapy techniques (1:1 ratio). A dose of 60 or 65 Gy was prescribed in 30 daily fractions given Monday to Friday. Treatment was not masked. Randomisation was by computer-generated permuted blocks and was stratified by centre and tumour site. Our primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with grade 2 or worse xerostomia at 12 months, as assessed by the Late Effects of Normal Tissue (LENT SOMA) scale. Analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis, with all patients who had assessments included. Long-term follow-up of patients is ongoing. This study is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial register, number ISRCTN48243537.Findings47 patients were assigned to each treatment arm. Median follow-up was 44·0 months (IQR 30·0–59·7). Six patients from each group died before 12 months and seven patients from the conventional radiotherapy and two from the IMRT group were not assessed at 12 months. At 12 months xerostomia side-effects were reported in 73 of 82 alive patients; grade 2 or worse xerostomia at 12 months was significantly lower in the IMRT group than in the conventional radiotherapy group (25 [74%; 95% CI 56–87] of 34 patients given conventional radiotherapy vs 15 [38%; 23–55] of 39 given IMRT, p=0·0027). The only recorded acute adverse event of grade 2 or worse that differed significantly between the treatment groups was fatigue, which was more prevalent in the IMRT group (18 [41%; 99% CI 23–61] of 44 patients given conventional radiotherapy vs 35 [74%; 55–89] of 47 given IMRT, p=0·0015). At 24 months, grade 2 or worse xerostomia was significantly less common with IMRT than with conventional radiotherapy (20 [83%; 95% CI 63–95] of 24 patients given conventional radiotherapy vs nine [29%; 14–48] of 31 given IMRT; p<0·0001). At 12 and 24 months, significant benefits were seen in recovery of saliva secretion with IMRT compared with conventional radiotherapy, as were clinically significant improvements in dry-mouth-specific and global quality of life scores. At 24 months, no significant differences were seen between randomised groups in non-xerostomia late toxicities, locoregional control, or overall survival.InterpretationSparing the parotid glands with IMRT significantly reduces the incidence of xerostomia and leads to recovery of saliva secretion and improvements in associated quality of life, and thus strongly supports a role for IMRT in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck.FundingCancer Research UK (CRUK/03/005).


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